INCREASED HUMIDITY IS ASSOCIATED WITH GREATER INCIDENCE OF ST ELEVATION MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: FINDINGS FROM A REGIONAL STEMI NETWORK
CCC ePoster Library. Anpalagan T. 10/26/19; 280319; 261
Ms. Tharani Anpalagan
Ms. Tharani Anpalagan
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Abstract
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BACKGROUND: Prior studies have demonstrated a relationship between colder temperature and greater STEMI incidence; however, little is known regarding the effect of additional environment parameters such as humidity and air quality on STEMI incidence in Canada.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 1,477 consecutive STEMI patients referred to St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Ontario for primary percutaneous coronary intervention between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014. Weather variables including daily maximum, minimum, mean and range of temperature, total daily snowfall and precipitation, humidity and air quality index for the study period were obtained from the Government of Canada Historical Climate Data and Air Quality Ontario website. The association between each of the weather parameters and the STEMI incidence was determined using negative binomial regression. The average±standard deviation (SD) age of the study population was 61±13 years; 78% were male, 20% had diabetes, 56% had hypertension, 75% had dyslipidemia, 69% were either former or current smoker, 10.2% had prior MI, and 11.5% had prior PCI. The average±SD daily STEMI incidence was 0.578±0.785. The median (25th, 75th percentile) daily maximum temperature was 13.9°C (4.4, 23.1), minimum temperature was 6.2°C (-0.9, 14.4), mean temperature was 10.2°C (1.8, 18.7), total daily snowfall and precipitation was 0mm (0, 0), humidity was 67% (54, 80), and air quality index was 21 units (17, 27). There was no association between daily maximum temperature (0.98 RR per 10°C, 95%CI 0.94, 1.03, p=0.526), daily minimum temperature (0.98 RR per 10 °C, 95%CI 0.93, 1.03, p=0.449), daily mean temperature (0.98 RR per 10°C, 95%CI 0.93, 1.03, p=0.484), daily range of temperature (1.00 RR per 5°C, 95% 0.92, 1.10, p=0.926), daily snowfall (1.00 RR per cm, 95%CI 0.97, 1.03, p=0.995), precipitation (0.96 RR per 10 mm, 95%CI 0.88, 1.06, p=0.436) or air quality index (1.01 RR per 5 units, 95%CI 0.98, 1.04, p=0.580) and STEMI incidence. There was a significant association between humidity and rate of STEMI incidence (1.15 RR per 10% increase, 95%CI 1.12-1.19, p < 0.001) (Figure 1).

CONCLUSION: Higher humidity level was associated with greater incidence of STEMI. Further investigation is required to understand the biologic mechanisms linking increased humidity to myocardial infarction.
BACKGROUND: Prior studies have demonstrated a relationship between colder temperature and greater STEMI incidence; however, little is known regarding the effect of additional environment parameters such as humidity and air quality on STEMI incidence in Canada.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 1,477 consecutive STEMI patients referred to St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Ontario for primary percutaneous coronary intervention between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014. Weather variables including daily maximum, minimum, mean and range of temperature, total daily snowfall and precipitation, humidity and air quality index for the study period were obtained from the Government of Canada Historical Climate Data and Air Quality Ontario website. The association between each of the weather parameters and the STEMI incidence was determined using negative binomial regression. The average±standard deviation (SD) age of the study population was 61±13 years; 78% were male, 20% had diabetes, 56% had hypertension, 75% had dyslipidemia, 69% were either former or current smoker, 10.2% had prior MI, and 11.5% had prior PCI. The average±SD daily STEMI incidence was 0.578±0.785. The median (25th, 75th percentile) daily maximum temperature was 13.9°C (4.4, 23.1), minimum temperature was 6.2°C (-0.9, 14.4), mean temperature was 10.2°C (1.8, 18.7), total daily snowfall and precipitation was 0mm (0, 0), humidity was 67% (54, 80), and air quality index was 21 units (17, 27). There was no association between daily maximum temperature (0.98 RR per 10°C, 95%CI 0.94, 1.03, p=0.526), daily minimum temperature (0.98 RR per 10 °C, 95%CI 0.93, 1.03, p=0.449), daily mean temperature (0.98 RR per 10°C, 95%CI 0.93, 1.03, p=0.484), daily range of temperature (1.00 RR per 5°C, 95% 0.92, 1.10, p=0.926), daily snowfall (1.00 RR per cm, 95%CI 0.97, 1.03, p=0.995), precipitation (0.96 RR per 10 mm, 95%CI 0.88, 1.06, p=0.436) or air quality index (1.01 RR per 5 units, 95%CI 0.98, 1.04, p=0.580) and STEMI incidence. There was a significant association between humidity and rate of STEMI incidence (1.15 RR per 10% increase, 95%CI 1.12-1.19, p < 0.001) (Figure 1).

CONCLUSION: Higher humidity level was associated with greater incidence of STEMI. Further investigation is required to understand the biologic mechanisms linking increased humidity to myocardial infarction.
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